Kyoto / St. John the Baptist Church

St. John the Baptist Church, Miyazu

The church was built in 1896. It is said to be the second oldest Catholic church existing in Japan (the oldest among currently active churches). This is a precious building with the appearance of Christian churches passed down from the Meiji Era. It has a western-style exterior with stained glass windows, in contrast, it has tatami mats inside.
Christianity was introduced to Miyazu by the French missionary Jean-Louis Relave. Father Relave came to Japan in 1885, and three years after he learned Japanese, he arrived at Miyazu in 1888 after stopping over at Wakasa (Tsuruga, Obama, and Takahama) and Maizuru. Afterwards, he engaged in missionary work throughout the Tango area, Tajima and Ikuno Ginzan. Goroemon Tai, a prominent local figure and land owner, whose illness had been healed miraculously as a result of getting baptized in Tokyo by a priest belonging to the Paris Foreign Missions Society, offered to donate land for the premises of the church to Father Relave as a thanksgiving for that healing. Father Relave accepted his offer to start the construction of the church, and the current church was established.

Location500 Aza-Miyamoto, Miyazu City, Kyoto Prefecture Google Maps
Tour application / Contact informationTEL:+81-772-45-1625 / FAX:+81-772-22-8480 (Miyazu City Office,Tourism Exchange Division) (English is available only when English speaking staff is in the office)
ContactTEL:+81-772-22-3127/FAX:+81-772-22-3684 (English is available only when a foreign priest is present)
e-mailk-machi@city.miyazu.kyoto.jp
Open hours9:00am - 5:00pm (general tours are not allowed between 9:30am and 11:00am on Sunday due to Mass)
Periods of closureNone
Admission feeFree
Mass informationSunday 10:00am - 11:00am(except from July to September ) Tuesday 10:00am - 11:00am
Special noticesEnglish is available when a foreign priest is present.
Tours are not allowed during Mass.
Access8 minutes walk from Miyazu Station on the Kyoto Tango Tetsudo Line towards Amanohashidate.
Further informationClick here